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superb 2015-04-25

Manga (?? Manga?) are comics created in Japan, or by Japanese creators in the Japanese language, conforming to a style developed in Japan in the late 19th century.[1] They have a long and complex pre-history in earlier Japanese art.[2] In Japan, people of all ages read manga. The medium includes works in a broad range of genres: action-adventure, romance, sports and games, historical drama, comedy, science fiction and fantasy, mystery, suspense, detective, horror, sexuality, and business/commerce, among others. Although this form of entertainment originated in Japan, many manga are translated into other languages, mainly English.[3] Since the 1950s, manga has steadily become a major part of the Japanese publishing industry,[4] representing a ¥406 billion market in Japan in 2007 (approximately $3.6 billion) and ¥420 billion ($5.5 billion) in 2009.[5] Manga have also gained a significant worldwide audience.[6] In Europe and the Middle East the market is worth $250 million.[7] In 2008, in the U.S. and Canada, the manga market was valued at $175 million. The markets in France and the United States are about the same size. Manga stories are typically printed in black-and-white,[8] although some full-color manga exist (e.g. Colorful). In Japan, manga are usually serialized in large manga magazines, often containing many stories, each presented in a single episode to be continued in the next issue. If the series is successful, collected chapters may be republished in tank?bon volumes, frequently but not exclusively, paperback books.[9] A manga artist (mangaka in Japanese) typically works with a few assistants in a small studio and is associated with a creative editor from a commercial publishing company.[10] If a manga series is popular enough, it may be animated after or even during its run.[11] Sometimes manga are drawn centering on previously existing live-action or animated films.[12] The term manga (kanji: ??; hiragana: ???; katakana: ???; About this sound listen (help·inf

the red sea 2015-06-21

In many ways, The Red Sea Sharks feels like a conclusion to The Adventures of Tintin. Drawing together countless plot threads and supporting characters into one massive confrontation between Tintin and Rastapopoulos, providing some nice set pieces and a tour of the globe, the adventure feels like it’s really wrapping up all the left over bits and pieces the series has accumulated since Cigars of the Pharaoh. The four adventures that followed would have a markedly different tone, to the point where they almost felt like an epilogue, examining what happened after Tintin’s globe-trotting adventures had concluded. The animated adaptation of the episode seems to treat it as an adventure relatively epic in scope, and again makes a surprising case for an unconventional candidate for a potential movie adaptation.

super on 15-Jul-2015 2015-07-15

The classic graphic novel When his old friend Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab is overthrown by Sheikh Bab El Ehr, Tintin goes to his aid. But before Tintin can help return his friend to power, he will have to survive shipwrecks, fires, and worst of all, Abdullah, the emir's rotten son.Hergé, one of the most famous Belgians in the world, was a comics writer and artist. The internationally successful Adventures of Tintin are his most well-known and beloved works. They have been translated into 38 different languages and have inspired such legends as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. He wrote and illustrated for The Adventures of Tintin until his death in 1983.

the red sea sharks 2015-07-16

the title of this book is "the red sea sharks".it is written in english language.the author is herge.the story is the very interesting story that the tintin and the captain haddock went in the ship to khemed to rescue emir from the dangerous arm smugglerswho over thrown his government.they had a very big adventure while rescuing emir from there.and also they went in ship.if any tsunami came means all will be die immediately.this is the interesting adventure and a different adventure i have read in my list of books.so i liked this book.

Great book 2015-07-25

this book is so adventures and even so fictional. It is so useful to admire us in the book. Such types of books are needed to be admirable. It is simply superb. A best story for the children and the students . It may be interesting to elders. When I read this book.. I was lost in it...

the red sea sharks 2015-08-06

The Red Sea Sharks (French: Coke en stock) is the nineteenth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The "Coke" referred to in the original French title is a code name used by the villainous antagonists of the story for African slaves. The Red Sea Sharks is notable for bringing together a large number of characters from previous Tintin adventures.In Brussels, Tintin and Captain Haddock bump into an old acquaintance, General Alcazar. They exchange contacts and Alcazar rushes off, dropping his wallet. Tintin attempts to return it only to learn he gave them a false address. Examining its contents, they find photos of De Havilland Mosquitos and other military aircraft. They also find a proper address and return the wallet to the hotel's front desk, where they see Alcazar in conversation with arms dealer J.M Dawson, and notice Thomson and Thompson listening in. When they return home to Marlinspike Hall, they discover that the Emir of Khemed, Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab, has been overthrown by his nemesis Sheikh Bab El Ehr. The surprise coup was successful due to air support in the form of Mosquitos. The Emir has sent his son, the disobedient Abdullah, to stay at Marlinspike for his own protection. Abdullah proceeds to cause chaos at Marlinspike with his practical jokes. Later, the detectives visit and accidentally inform Tintin that Alcazar has been involved in arms dealings with Dawson. Following an ad in a newspaper offering military equipment for sale, Tintin finds Dawson, learning that he sold the Mosquitos to Bab El Ehr. Tintin decides to go to Khemed and rescue the Emir, with Haddock reluctantly agreeing to join in in order to avoid Abdullah's tricks. Arriving in the country, the duo narrowly survive a bomb planted aboard a plane to kill them, and are able to slip into the city of Wadeshah unobserved. There they meet an old friend, the Portuguese merchant Oliveira da Figueira, who helps them to escape the city and ride on horseback to the Emir's hideout. They are pursued by armoured cars and fighter planes ordered to intercept them by Mull Pasha, who is actually Tintin's old antagonist, Dr. Müller. The pursuit ends when Müller's confusing orders cause the aircraft to destroy the armoured cars, and the Mosquitos are ordered back to base. The Emir welcomes Tintin and Haddock. He reveals that there is an ongoing slave trade through Khemed, and the traders organized the coup when the Emir threatened to reveal them. The ring is operated by international businessman Marquis di Gorgonzola, who falsely offers transport to African Muslims on the pilgrimage to Mecca and then sells them into slavery. Tintin and Haddock leave for the Red Sea coast and board a sambuk for Mecca to investigate. They are attacked by the Mosquitos; Tintin shoots down one of the planes and rescues its Estonian pilot, Piotr Skut. The three are picked up by di Gorgonzola's yacht, the Scheherazade, but they are soon offloaded onto the SS Ramona, a tramp steamer. Unbeknownst to Tintin and Haddock, the Ramona is one of di Gorgonzola's own ships, used in the slave trade. Allan, Haddock's former chief mate and commander of the Romana, abandons the ship during the middle of the night after setting fire to it in an attempt to cause explosives in the forward hold to explode. Awakening, Tintin, Haddock, and Skut discover the fire and put it out with the help of a huge wave. Examining the ship, they find that the other holds are full of enslaved Africans. Haddock releases them and asks for volunteers to help run the ship, heading for Djibouti. Allan and the crew notice the fire go out and attempt to return to the ship, only to see it start up and pull away. Haddock's skepticism about the Emir's story ends when a dhow flags down the Ramona and a trader comes aboard and asks to see the "coke". Haddock states they are not carrying any; the trader laughs and begins to examine one of the Africans. Haddock throws him off the ship, and the trader contacts di Gorgonzola, who dispatches a U-Boat to destroy the Ramona and the evidence it carries. In the meantime, Skut attempts to repair the ship's damaged radio, but an unexpected accident shakes it into working order: hurrying to inform Haddock, Tintin accidentally spots the submarine's periscope just prior to the attack, allowing Haddock to carefully outmaneuver a number of torpedoes while Tintin sends out a distress call. At the height of the battle the engine room telegraph breaks, interfering with his orders. The submarine captain is lining up for another shot when they are depth charged by aircraft from the cruiser USS Los Angeles, who Tintin had successfully managed to radio. A last attempt is made to destroy the Ramona with a limpet mine, but the frogman is hit by the ship's anchor and drops the mine. The Los Angeles chases down the Scheherazade and attempts to arrest di Gorgonzola, but he fakes his own death and escapes via a mini-submarine. Tintin and Hadd

The Red Sea Sharks 2016-02-27

The Red Sea Sharks is, I suppose, a fine adventure tale, even if it’s not an entry in Hergé’s canon that I’m particularly fond of. The nineteenth installment in the series, the author uses the opportunity to tie a whole slew of open story threads together and anchor the long-term continuity of the series, but he also decides to deal with the issue of modern slavery – a controversial and topical issue, to be sure. However, while I have no doubt the author’s intentions were true, the story reads more than a little awkwardly in dealing with the topic.The story finds room from all sorts, including a short cameo from Doctor J. W. Müller himself and reappearance of Haddock’s treacherous first mate Allan, tempting the good captain with the demon drink. While all of this is a credit to the sheer level of detail in the world that Hergé has built, it can’t help but feel a little gimmicky and a little too hackneyed. I think it probably says something about me that I can accept Tintin and Haddock flying to the moon, but have a bit of bother with the idea of all of Tintin’s bad guys collaborating on one evil plot. Though, to be fair to Hergé, he seems to concede the point with the opening, where Haddock dismisses a movie’s plotting as “too improbable” in the way it ties the characters together. In fairness, Hergé seems to have had a bit of sense of humour about his stories for quite a while now, and I like the way that he has Haddock actually call his friend Tintin on his incredibly reckless pursuit of mystery, to the point of putting the pair in the face of mortal danger. When clues lead overseas to an unstable country, as they seem to do with increasing frequency, Haddock actually wonders out loud why on earth they would fly into such obvious peril. “What? Khemed? In the middle of a revolution! You’re crazy!” Of course, the pair inevitably end up going, but it makes it clear that Hergé’s series of books are increasingly self-aware – a trend that would reach its zenith in The Castafiore Emerald.Despite the hook of tying all Tintin’s foes together, it’s actually a fairly conventional adventure… at least if you discount the slave-trading at the centre of the story. I realise that Hergé undoubtedly intended to draw attention to a very serious international crime, but it’s hard to take it all seriously when the author seems quite clumsy in his manner of addressing it. His artwork has come a long way since the racist caricatures in Tintin in the Congo, but I still feel more than a little bit uncomfortable when I see Hergé draw Africans. It’s hard to believe that, as the sixties approached, the artist was still drawing the characters with stereotypically large lips and giving them condescending dialogue like, “We good black men… Want come out… No can breathe… We afraid…” I know that certain characters in the stories don’t speak perfect English, but none of Hergé’s foreigners seem quite so underdeveloped. It takes the Africans a page to understand the idea Haddock is explaining to them: the notion that the trip to Mecca was a trap. More than that, though, Tintin and Haddock – while condemning the traders – don’t seem too concerned about the health of their passengers. They put out a fire on the ship at night, and it’s well past dawn when Tintin remarks, “And now for the Negroes.” Even then, Haddock isn’t concerned about the Africans trapped below decks (who might be sick, or injured, or even drowned), responding, “There’s something more urgent: to send out a distress signal by radio.” When they cry for However, there are other more awkward concerns. Emir Mohammed ben Kalish Ezab explains to Tintin about his dealings with the company, “I also used another threat: that I would reveal to the world that Arabair are involved in slave-trading.” This implies that the Emir was willing to allow the slave-trading to continue as long as he got what he needed – that the idea of people trafficking in slaves was not morally repugnant to him, and was only really of use as leverage in negotiations. That’s grand – I accept that bad people to exist in these stories – but I find it fascinating that Tintin remains on good terms with a person like that. It just seems inherently wrong to keep babysitting for somebody like that, and Tintin give no indication of any objection to the Emir’s approach. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but it does bother me. And, truth be told, it overshadows the story a bit. The Red Sea Sharks is about as conventional a Tintin story as you can get – and it features some wonderful art from Hergé – but I never really warmed to it. I had a bit of difficulty with how Hergé handled his racially-themed content, and I also found the “all of Tintin’s bad guys working together” plot point a little forced. Still, things were about to get considerably different.help as Haddock is ready to let them out, he very dismissively exclaims, “All right, I’m coming now.”

Adventurous 2016-03-24

Literally amazing. Very beautifully illustrated and written especially for small children. The language of this book is really simple and amazing. Loved this book very much and reall enjoyed it a lot. Tintin has always been one of my favourate heroes right from my childhood and always will be. It always takes me on an adventurous journey.

the red sea shark by herge 2016-08-02

In many ways, The Red Sea Sharks feels like a conclusion to The Adventures of Tintin. Drawing together countless plot threads and supporting characters into one massive confrontation between Tintin and Rastapopoulos, providing some nice set pieces and a tour of the globe, the adventure feels like it’s really wrapping up all the left over bits and pieces the series has accumulated since Cigars of the Pharaoh. The four adventures that followed would have a markedly different tone, to the point where they almost felt like an epilogue, examining what happened after Tintin’s globe-trotting adventures had concluded. The animated adaptation of the episode seems to treat it as an adventure relatively epic in scope, and again makes a surprising case for an unconventional candidate for a potential movie adaptation. Just plane trouble... A lot has been written about The Red Sea Sharks. It has been suggested the Hergé wrote the book as part of a retroactive attempt to exonerate himself from various high-profile controversies the series had found itself occasionally wrapped up in. In particular, his book allowed Tintin and Haddock the chance to break up a slavery ring trafficking in Africans, as if to refute the allegations of racism that had been made against the author for earlier work like Tintin in the Congo. I remarked in my review that Hergé didn’t necessarily handle himself especially well in writing those characters, who attack Haddock for trying to save them, as if unfairly blaming Haddock for their captivity. I’m actually really glad that the animated adaptation drops that aspect of the story, to be honest. I’ve never liked how Hergé drew black characters, with those ridiculous lips and the stereotypical hair. I know it’s a style that was wildly used during the thirties (including, for example, in Looney Tunes), but that only explains the decision – it doesn’t make it any more comfortable to watch or to read. As much as one can contextualise those sorts of things by dismissing them as a sign of the times, it’s still hard to get past such basic issues. It doesn’t help that Hergé was still illustrating the same characters the same way even years after the original controversy. Alcazar, how bizarre! The script abandons the slavery aspect completely, perhaps feeling that it isn’t an appropriate topic to broach on a family television show. That itself is a fascinating possibility, because some of the earlier stories dealt with opium smuggling. Instead, the episode tells us “some pretty nasty illegal traffic” is moving through the region. When Tintin and Haddock burst open the hold, they find some Arab prisoners. “We are refugees,” one explains. As well as speaking clearer English than Hergé’s African characters, it’s notable that their racial characteristics are not crudely exaggerated. And when Haddock asks for help running the ship, they do more than menial labour. The bad guys’ plans apparently don’t plan to make these people slaves, but instead just steal their money. “They probably intend to dump them at sea!” Tintin deduces. It’s not a bad touch. Being honest, I don’t think Hergé handled the race aspect of the issue well enough to justify keeping it. His own defense of his attitudes raises quite a few awkward questions of itself, after all. This is one of the few cases where I’m actually perfectly happy for the animated series to carefully sidestep Hergé’s text, and I think the team actually do a great job with the source material. Indeed, they even keep in some of Hergé’s other ideas and themes, especially with the Marquis’ yatch. Offering Haddock a sharp rebuke... The upper class are completely taken in by the sinister ruse, perhaps like Hergé felt he was during his brief flirtation with fascism. It’s liberal fascination expressing itself without any experience to back it up, just abstract theories and concepts. “I’ve always wanted to see real castaways!” one guest shouts as the boat takes on three thirsty fugitives. It doesn’t matter that the three might be dying, they’re an abstract curiosity to the wealthy people on the boat itself. More than that though, the episode actually catches a lot of fun and excitement, some of which I missed when reading the book, which felt a bit disjointed. In increasing the role of “the Mullpacha”, the team streamline the story enough to allow it work without all the characters and convolutions of Hergé’s story. I actually think this more efficient adaptation suits the source material almost perfectly, and it adds a sense of excitement and urgency to the story that got lost with the ridiculous scale. There's something on the wing! And I think the episode actually makes a solid case for this as an epic Tintin adventure story. With less convoluted elements and not feeling the need to fit in every tiny reference, there’s more room to appreciate the trip that takes Tintin around the world. There are also some nice bits of humour, as David Fox con

The Red Sea Sharks (Tintin) 2016-10-26

This one takes us to familiar places and brings back familiar faces. The story isn't as interesting as some of the earlier ones, also because, if you've read the others, you find this a little repetitive. Tintin, Snowy and the Captain are back in Khemed and you have the usual betrayal, smuggling, rat-tat-tat etc. But it's nice to see Haddock back as Captain he even gives us the original “I am captain now”)! There are also new elements introduced which save the story to a great extent. The best parts of this story, however, are still the physical comedy involving Captain Haddock, Calculus and the Thomsons.

Amusing Sharks 2016-12-19

The Red Sea Sharks were really amusing. It was one of the best comic series written by Herge. It was one of my great experience. It was full thrill and adventure in water. I was very happy and excited to read this book. The cover page of this book is very attractive.

the red sea sharks 2016-12-23

Story Captain Haddock simply cannot believe it, but human trafficking really is still going on, even in the twentieth century (and today in the twenty-first century). The Red Sea Sharks lifts the veil on the scandal of the modern day slave trade. Hergstayed abreast of current affairs, and as was his style, for this story he wove real-life news into action-packed adventure. Beginning at the end In classic literature a story does not usually start at the end, and nor do comic strips usually begin with the words HE END And yet this is exactly how Herglaunches the story of The Red Sea Sharks

very good! 2016-12-24

this book is one of my favourite books of tintin where the shark attacks the ship and one of the friends of tintin gets lost in the sea and tintin tries to save him and is one of the best books of herge i like its words and has good punctuation and is where it gets its best of herge

by Subba Rao 2017-01-21

by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge by Herge

The Red Sea Sharks (Tintin) (English) by Herge 2017-09-06

The Red Sea Sharks (French: Coke en stock) is the nineteenth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story was initially serialised weekly in Belgium's Tintin magazine from October 1956 to January 1958 before being published in a collected volume by Casterman in 1958. The narrative follows the young reporter Tintin, his dog Snowy, and his friend Captain Haddock as they travel to the (fictional) Middle Eastern kingdom of Khemed with the intention of aiding the Emir Ben Kalish Ezab in regaining control after a coup d'état by his enemies, who are financed by slave traders. Following on from the previous volume in the series, The Calculus Affair, The Red Sea Sharks was created with the aid of Hergé's team of artists at Studios Hergé. Influenced by Honoré de Balzac's The Human Comedy, Hergé used the story as a vehicle in which to reintroduce a wide range of characters who had first appeared in earlier installments of the series. The story dealt with the ongoing trade in enslaved Africans across the Arab world, however in the 1960s the story would generate controversy as Hergé was repeatedly accused of having portrayed the Africans in a racist manner. He was upset by these claims, and made alterations to the depiction of the Africans in later reprints. Hergé continued The Adventures of Tintin with Tintin in Tibet, and the series as a whole became a defining part of the Franco-Belgian comics tradition. The Red Sea Sharks was critically well-received, with various commentators describing it as one of the best Tintin adventures. The story was adapted for the 1991 animated series The

The Red Sea Sharks 2017-09-06

There's a rebellion in Khemed and the Emir's life is in danger! He has entrusted his mischievous son to Captain Haddock's care, but when an old friend of Tintin's is caught smuggling arms to the Khemed rebels, they must jump straight on a plane to find out what on earth is going on...

The Red Sea Sharks The Red Sea Sharks is, I suppose, a fine adventure tale, even if it’s not an entry in Hergé’s canon that I’m particularly fond of. The nineteenth installment in the series, the author uses the opportunity to tie a whole slew of open sto 2017-09-09

The Red Sea Sharks The Red Sea Sharks is, I suppose, a fine adventure tale, even if it’s not an entry in Hergé’s canon that I’m particularly fond of. The nineteenth installment in the series, the author uses the opportunity to tie a whole slew of open story threads together and anchor the long-term continuity of the series, but he also decides to deal with the issue of modern slavery – a controversial and topical issue, to be sure. However, while I have no doubt the author’s intentions were true, the story reads more than a little awkwardly in dealing with the topic.The story finds room from all sorts, including a short cameo from Doctor J. W. Müller himself and reappearance of Haddock’s treacherous first mate Allan, tempting the good captain with the demon drink. While all of this is a credit to the sheer level of detail in the world that Hergé has built, it can’t help but feel a little gimmicky and a little too hackneyed. I think it probably says something about me that I can accept Tintin and Haddock flying to the moon, but have a bit of bother with the idea of all of Tintin’s bad guys collaborating on one evil plot. Though, to be fair to Hergé, he seems to concede the point with the opening, where Haddock dismisses a movie’s plotting as “too improbable” in the way it ties the characters together. In fairness, Hergé seems to have had a bit of sense of humour about his stories for quite a while now, and I like the way that he has Haddock actually call his friend Tintin on his incredibly reckless pursuit of mystery, to the point of putting the pair in the face of mortal danger. When clues lead overseas to an unstable country, as they seem to do with increasing frequency, Haddock actually wonders out loud why on earth they would fly into such obvious peril. “What? Khemed? In the middle of a revolution! You’re crazy!” Of course, the pair inevitably end up going, but it makes it clear that Hergé’s series of books are increasingly self-aware – a trend that would reach its zenith in The Castafiore Emerald.Despite the hook of tying all Tintin’s foes together, it’s actually a fairly conventional adventure… at least if you discount the slave-trading at the centre of the story. I realise that Hergé undoubtedly intended to draw attention to a very serious international crime, but it’s hard to take it all seriously when the author seems quite clumsy in his manner of addressing it. His artwork has come a long way since the racist caricatures in Tintin in the Congo, but I still feel more than a little bit uncomfortable when I see Hergé draw Africans. It’s hard to believe that, as the sixties approached, the artist was still drawing the characters with stereotypically large lips and giving them condescending dialogue like, “We good black men… Want come out… No can breathe… We afraid…” I know that certain characters in the stories don’t speak perfect English, but none of Hergé’s foreigners seem quite so underdeveloped. It takes the Africans a page to understand the idea Haddock is explaining to them: the notion that the trip to Mecca was a trap. More than that, though, Tintin and Haddock – while condemning the traders – don’t seem too concerned about the health of their passengers. They put out a fire on the ship at night, and it’s well past dawn when Tintin remarks, “And now for the Negroes.” Even then, Haddock isn’t concerned about the Africans trapped below decks (who might be sick, or injured, or even drowned), responding, “There’s something more urgent: to send out a distress signal by radio.” When they cry for However, there are other more awkward concerns. Emir Mohammed ben Kalish Ezab explains to Tintin about his dealings with the company, “I also used another threat: that I would reveal to the world that Arabair are involved in slave-trading.” This implies that the Emir was willing to allow the slave-trading to continue as long as he got what he needed – that the idea of people trafficking in slaves was not morally repugnant to him, and was only really of use as leverage in negotiations. That’s grand – I accept that bad people to exist in these stories – but I find it fascinating that Tintin remains on good terms with a person like that. It just seems inherently wrong to keep babysitting for somebody like that, and Tintin give no indication of any objection to the Emir’s approach. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but it does bother me. And, truth be told, it overshadows the story a bit. The Red Sea Sharks is about as conventional a Tintin story as you can get – and it features some wonderful art from Hergé – but I never really warmed to it. I had a bit of difficulty with how Hergé handled his racially-themed content, and I also found the “all of Tintin’s bad guys working together” plot point a little forced. Still, things were about to get considerably different.help as Haddock is ready to let them out, he very dismissively exclaims, “All right, I’m coming now.”

The Red Sea Sharks by herge 2017-12-29

The Red Sea Sharks is, I suppose, a fine adventure tale, even if it’s not an entry in Hergé’s canon that I’m particularly fond of. The nineteenth installment in the series, the author uses the opportunity to tie a whole slew of open story threads together and anchor the long-term continuity of the series, but he also decides to deal with the issue of modern slavery – a controversial and topical issue, to be sure. However, while I have no doubt the author’s intentions were true, the story reads more than a little awkwardly in dealing with the topic.The story finds room from all sorts, including a short cameo from Doctor J. W. Müller himself and reappearance of Haddock’s treacherous first mate Allan, tempting the good captain with the demon drink. While all of this is a credit to the sheer level of detail in the world that Hergé has built, it can’t help but feel a little gimmicky and a little too hackneyed. I think it probably says something about me that I can accept Tintin and Haddock flying to the moon, but have a bit of bother with the idea of all of Tintin’s bad guys collaborating on one evil plot. Though, to be fair to Hergé, he seems to concede the point with the opening, where Haddock dismisses a movie’s plotting as “too improbable” in the way it ties the characters together. In fairness, Hergé seems to have had a bit of sense of humour about his stories for quite a while now, and I like the way that he has Haddock actually call his friend Tintin on his incredibly reckless pursuit of mystery, to the point of putting the pair in the face of mortal danger. When clues lead overseas to an unstable country, as they seem to do with increasing frequency, Haddock actually wonders out loud why on earth they would fly into such obvious peril. “What? Khemed? In the middle of a revolution! You’re crazy!” Of course, the pair inevitably end up going, but it makes it clear that Hergé’s series of books are increasingly self-aware – a trend that would reach its zenith in The Castafiore Emerald.Despite the hook of tying all Tintin’s foes together, it’s actually a fairly conventional adventure… at least if you discount the slave-trading at the centre of the story. I realise that Hergé undoubtedly intended to draw attention to a very serious international crime, but it’s hard to take it all seriously when the author seems quite clumsy in his manner of addressing it. His artwork has come a long way since the racist caricatures in Tintin in the Congo, but I still feel more than a little bit uncomfortable when I see Hergé draw Africans. It’s hard to believe that, as the sixties approached, the artist was still drawing the characters with stereotypically large lips and giving them condescending dialogue like, “We good black men… Want come out… No can breathe… We afraid…” I know that certain characters in the stories don’t speak perfect English, but none of Hergé’s foreigners seem quite so underdeveloped. It takes the Africans a page to understand the idea Haddock is explaining to them: the notion that the trip to Mecca was a trap. More than that, though, Tintin and Haddock – while condemning the traders – don’t seem too concerned about the health of their passengers. They put out a fire on the ship at night, and it’s well past dawn when Tintin remarks, “And now for the Negroes.” Even then, Haddock isn’t concerned about the Africans trapped below decks (who might be sick, or injured, or even drowned), responding, “There’s something more urgent: to send out a distress signal by radio.” When they cry for However, there are other more awkward concerns. Emir Mohammed ben Kalish Ezab explains to Tintin about his dealings with the company, “I also used another threat: that I would reveal to the world that Arabair are involved in slave-trading.” This implies that the Emir was willing to allow the slave-trading to continue as long as he got what he needed – that the idea of people trafficking in slaves was not morally repugnant to him, and was only really of use as leverage in negotiations. That’s grand – I accept that bad people to exist in these stories – but I find it fascinating that Tintin remains on good terms with a person like that. It just seems inherently wrong to keep babysitting for somebody like that, and Tintin give no indication of any objection to the Emir’s approach. Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but it does bother me. And, truth be told, it overshadows the story a bit. The Red Sea Sharks is about as conventional a Tintin story as you can get – and it features some wonderful art from Hergé – but I never really warmed to it. I had a bit of difficulty with how Hergé handled his racially-themed content, and I also found the “all of Tintin’s bad guys working together” plot point a little forced. Still, things were about to get considerably different.help as Haddock is ready to let them out, he very dismissively exclaims, “All right, I’m coming now.”